Author Archives: Dr. Kelli Sandman-Hurley

Dear Struggling Student: I Failed a Test Too

 Dear Struggling Student: I Failed a Test this Year

Dear Struggling Students - I Failed a Test Too - A Letter to Students by Dr. Kelli Sandman-Hurley - DyslexiaTrainingInstitute.org

For those of us who work with students with dyslexia, and don’t have dyslexia ourselves, we have to be extremely observant of our students. We have to develop empathy. We have to understand the nuances of each and every one of our students. I never tell my students I know how they feel. I make a very conscious effort to never tell them, or insinuate, they aren’t trying hard enough. But I am human. I have gotten frustrated, but I pull it together quickly and I verbally let the student know the problem is my teaching, not their learning. But nothing seemed to connect me more with my students than what I shared with them this year.

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My Dyslexia Hill Days Rally Cry

My Dyslexia Hill Days Rally Cry

I often feel like a fish out of water at these events because my experience is not as a parent but as an advocate, trainer and scholar of the English writing system. I want to start by congratulating you all on all the accomplishments Decoding Dyslexia has made over the years. I have been around awhile and I always say that when I first noticed DDNJ and starting watching them on Facebook and then saw all the other branches pop and start making things happen I was in awe. I saw more progress in 5 years than other organizations have done in the 20 years I have been involved in the dyslexia community.  So, you have a lot of be proud of.

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Dyslexia is a Gift? Where is the Return Line? Part 2

Dyslexia is a gift? Where's the Return Line? PART 2

In a previous blog post I laid out my reasons for why I do not believe dyslexia is a gift. In that blog post I specifically stated that many students with dyslexia will be successful because of their resilience and because of the support they received, while pointing out that many many kids don’t have that support, which was, and is, my main point. Many people chose to ignore that sentence and instead respond to something I did not say, which is that kids with dyslexia will never amount to anything. But for the most part, you all agreed with me, at least to a degree. So, as I started to really reflect and read and reread all of the responses, it got me thinking about resilience and support. Then it dawned on me that there was one important point I did not make and that is to describe a situation when dyslexia is a gift.

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